cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
JerryH
Resolver III
Resolver III

Insert Media > Add Picture - Simple instructions and attach to email

hi

Can anyone direct me to "simple to follow instructions" to Insert Media > Add Picture - and then attach photo to email coding

Thanks

Jerry

AddMedia.PNG

3 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

Hi @JerryH, this took a little digging for me as I have managed to go this long without ever sending an email with an attachment from Power Apps. Pulling from your other thread, you would add the following to the code in curly braces:

Attachments: {Name: AddMediaButton1.FileName, ContentBytes: UploadedImage1.Image, '@odata.type': ""}

where AddMediaButton1 and UploadedImage1 are the default names of the two items in the AddMediaWithImage control. 

 

So if I grab your previous code from the other thread, it would look something like this:

Office365Outlook.SendEmailV2(
    "jerry.hald@nworld.com",
    "Asset Fault Log Request",
    "Equipment Fault - Call out required" & Concat(
        FaultList,
        "<table style='700'>
            <tr>
                <td><b>Client Name :</b></td>
                <td>" & ManufacturerName & "</td>
            </tr>" &
            "<tr>
                <td><b>Location :</b></td>
                <td>" & LocationName & "</td>
            </tr>" &
            "<tr>
                <td><b>Asset Description :</b></td>
                <td>" & AssetDecription & "</td>
            </tr>" &
            "<tr>
                <td><b>Serial Number :</b></td>
                <td>" & 'Device Name' & "</td>
            </tr>
        </table></body>"
    ),
    {
        Importance: "Normal"
        Attachments: {Name: AddMediaButton1.FileName, ContentBytes: UploadedImage1.Image, '@odata.type': ""}
    }
)

Again, you may need to change the AddMediaButton1 and UploadedImage1 titles to match the names you have. It's a bit of a beast but the main takeaway is that the Attachments section needs to be a table with those three items (Name, ContentBytes, and '@odata.type' which has a blank value). With this in mind, you could put multiple items in a collection and use that to send numerous attachments if needed.

 

I hope that gets you going! Let me know either way and I will follow up if needed!

View solution in original post

wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

Hi @JerryH! Sorry for the non-response to your first message; it's been a full day. 😵 😁 For the record, I'm fine with you posting in the same thread. It could be good to make a new thread if the issue is different enough and you think others could benefit from seeing it but otherwise we can keep it all in the same one. 

 

From looking at your code, I am noticing that the closing parentheses are missing from the Patch statement and the ForAll statement. That might explain the two errors you are seeing. Let's start there and see if that solves it!

 

ForAll(
    Filter(
        Devices1_1.AllItems,
        VerifyItem_1.Value = true
    ),
    Patch(
        Devices,
        Defaults(Devices), 
        {
            Name: User().FullName,
            Date: Now(),
            Status: "Confirmed"
        }
    )
)

 

View solution in original post

wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

Hey @JerryH, so I have good news and bad news. The bad news is that I couldn't find a way to use the disambiguation operator on the gallery reference. This means that the ForAll loop will only look at the first item in the gallery and never make it past that one. It also seems that it isn't possible to reference the GUID that Power Apps assigns. This part might not be too much of a problem as long as you have one unique value, like a device name or something, that you can reference. It would also work to use multiple items in the LookUp to define a row if one value isn't unique but two or more together are.

 

The good news is that doing what you are trying without the gallery reference isn't too difficult. Here's what I did: 

 

On the checkbox control, I put the following items in the OnCheck and OnUncheck properties:

// OnCheck
Collect(colVerifiedDevices, ThisItem)

// OnUncheck
Remove(colVerifiedDevices, ThisItem)

This simply adds the row of data from the gallery into a collection called colVerifiedDevices if the box is checked and removes it if it is unchecked. I then used this collection in the ForAll loop instead of the gallery like so:

ForAll(
    colVerifiedDevices,
    Patch(
        Devices,
        LookUp(Devices, DeviceName = colVerifiedDevices[@DeviceName]), 
        {
            Name: User().FullName,
            Date: Now(),
            Status: "Confirmed"
        }
    )
);
Clear(colVerifiedDevices)

I assumed that the name of the column with Test6, Test7, Test8, etc. was called DeviceName, so you will want to change that with the field name with the unique values.

 

If you need to use more than one field to define a unique row, it would look something like this:

ForAll(
    colVerifiedDevices,
    Patch(
        Devices,
        LookUp(Devices, Field1 = colVerifiedDevices[@Field1] && Field2 = colVerifiedDevices[@Field2]), 
        {
            Name: User().FullName,
            Date: Now(),
            Status: "Confirmed"
        }
    )
);
Clear(colVerifiedDevices)

Just repeat the '&& Field# = colVerifiedDevices[@Field#]' for each additional field you need in there (where Field# is the column name of course).

 

One thing to note is the Clear(colVerifiedDevices) at the end of the ForAll Patch statement. This clears the collection out when the loop is done so those values aren't repeated.

 

I hope all of that makes sense but feel free to hit me up if it doesn't!

View solution in original post

11 REPLIES 11
wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

Hi @JerryH, this took a little digging for me as I have managed to go this long without ever sending an email with an attachment from Power Apps. Pulling from your other thread, you would add the following to the code in curly braces:

Attachments: {Name: AddMediaButton1.FileName, ContentBytes: UploadedImage1.Image, '@odata.type': ""}

where AddMediaButton1 and UploadedImage1 are the default names of the two items in the AddMediaWithImage control. 

 

So if I grab your previous code from the other thread, it would look something like this:

Office365Outlook.SendEmailV2(
    "jerry.hald@nworld.com",
    "Asset Fault Log Request",
    "Equipment Fault - Call out required" & Concat(
        FaultList,
        "<table style='700'>
            <tr>
                <td><b>Client Name :</b></td>
                <td>" & ManufacturerName & "</td>
            </tr>" &
            "<tr>
                <td><b>Location :</b></td>
                <td>" & LocationName & "</td>
            </tr>" &
            "<tr>
                <td><b>Asset Description :</b></td>
                <td>" & AssetDecription & "</td>
            </tr>" &
            "<tr>
                <td><b>Serial Number :</b></td>
                <td>" & 'Device Name' & "</td>
            </tr>
        </table></body>"
    ),
    {
        Importance: "Normal"
        Attachments: {Name: AddMediaButton1.FileName, ContentBytes: UploadedImage1.Image, '@odata.type': ""}
    }
)

Again, you may need to change the AddMediaButton1 and UploadedImage1 titles to match the names you have. It's a bit of a beast but the main takeaway is that the Attachments section needs to be a table with those three items (Name, ContentBytes, and '@odata.type' which has a blank value). With this in mind, you could put multiple items in a collection and use that to send numerous attachments if needed.

 

I hope that gets you going! Let me know either way and I will follow up if needed!

View solution in original post

Thank you so much...

I have a few other questions for my App?

Can i use this thread?

HI Wyotim

Any chance you can see if you can pick up an errors in this code? Basically, when user checks the checkbox, and presses button, it sends info back to datasource…..

 

ForAll(Filter(Devices1_1.AllItems,VerifyItem_1.Value = true),
Patch(Devices,Defaults(Devices),

{Name: User().Email,

Date: Now(),

Status: "Confirmed"}

 

Code.PNGPicture1.pngAssetVerification.PNG

wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

Hi @JerryH! Sorry for the non-response to your first message; it's been a full day. 😵 😁 For the record, I'm fine with you posting in the same thread. It could be good to make a new thread if the issue is different enough and you think others could benefit from seeing it but otherwise we can keep it all in the same one. 

 

From looking at your code, I am noticing that the closing parentheses are missing from the Patch statement and the ForAll statement. That might explain the two errors you are seeing. Let's start there and see if that solves it!

 

ForAll(
    Filter(
        Devices1_1.AllItems,
        VerifyItem_1.Value = true
    ),
    Patch(
        Devices,
        Defaults(Devices), 
        {
            Name: User().FullName,
            Date: Now(),
            Status: "Confirmed"
        }
    )
)

 

View solution in original post

Amazing!!!!!! That result made me so happy!

 

3 Questions.

1. The information recorded in my Datasource but in new rows... Can we get to show in correct asset row. See image below

2. With my Dropdowns - can we get the Item to default either to Blank or one of the Items such as Select?

3. Now that my App is almost complete. Should i move the Datasource from Excel to Sharepoint?

 

DefaultItem.PNG


RecordedAsset.PNG

wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

Hey @JerryH, glad that did the trick for you!

 

For the first question, the reason it is writing a new row is due to the Defaults(Devices) section of your code. This writes a new record using the default values of the data source listed. To update a row, you will need to swap that portion of code out with something that identifies a record. I'll need to test using a gallery as a reference in a ForAll loop as I have never done that before, but one general way to do it is to use a LookUp to find the specific record you are on in the loop in the data source. Something generally like this:

ForAll(
    ForAllDataSource,
    Patch(
        DataSourceName,
        LookUp(DatasourceName, FieldYouWant = ForAllDataSource[@FieldYouWant]),
        {
            ...
        }
    )
)

You will notice the square brackets and the @ symbol. The @ symbol is called a disambiguation operator and what it is doing is making sure Power Apps knows which field you are referencing, in this case, the particular FieldYouWant field that the ForAll loop is on in the ForAllDataSource data source. 

 

The best field to use here is something that uniquely defines that row, like an ID of some kind. In Excel, Power Apps makes that GUID column that I see at the end of your data table. That would be the best thing to use. As I said before, I am not sure of the syntax when referencing a gallery but I will test that after I post this message.

 

On question 2, this is possible. Dropdowns have an AllowEmptySelection property just for blank values. If you set that to true and then set the Default property to "", this should accomplish that part. If you are in a form, leaving the Default set to Parent.Default would show the value for that record or leave it blank if there is no value.

 

As far as the third question goes, SharePoint is a good data source and might be easier to use than Excel. Back in the old days when I got started with Power Apps, sharing an app with Excel as a data source didn't seem to work so well so I stopped trying and haven't attempted it since. I'm sure it's a much better experience now, but Excel does have limitations with how much data can be used and it is a bit on the slow side.

 

One thing about SharePoint to keep in mind is that anyone with access to that app will have access to that table on SharePoint, which is the same with Excel but SharePoint has lots of security options to control what data each person can see. I'm not a SharePoint expert at all (the company I work for uses SQL so that is what I know best) but there are some really good YouTube channels to check out if you want more info about building Power Apps for SharePoint and all the layers of permissions. Laura Rogers (WonderLaura) and Shane Young are both great channels to check out.

 

Hopefully, that helps but if I can try to clarify or explain more, let me know! And I'll get back on the gallery syntax as soon as I crack it.

wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

Hey @JerryH, so I have good news and bad news. The bad news is that I couldn't find a way to use the disambiguation operator on the gallery reference. This means that the ForAll loop will only look at the first item in the gallery and never make it past that one. It also seems that it isn't possible to reference the GUID that Power Apps assigns. This part might not be too much of a problem as long as you have one unique value, like a device name or something, that you can reference. It would also work to use multiple items in the LookUp to define a row if one value isn't unique but two or more together are.

 

The good news is that doing what you are trying without the gallery reference isn't too difficult. Here's what I did: 

 

On the checkbox control, I put the following items in the OnCheck and OnUncheck properties:

// OnCheck
Collect(colVerifiedDevices, ThisItem)

// OnUncheck
Remove(colVerifiedDevices, ThisItem)

This simply adds the row of data from the gallery into a collection called colVerifiedDevices if the box is checked and removes it if it is unchecked. I then used this collection in the ForAll loop instead of the gallery like so:

ForAll(
    colVerifiedDevices,
    Patch(
        Devices,
        LookUp(Devices, DeviceName = colVerifiedDevices[@DeviceName]), 
        {
            Name: User().FullName,
            Date: Now(),
            Status: "Confirmed"
        }
    )
);
Clear(colVerifiedDevices)

I assumed that the name of the column with Test6, Test7, Test8, etc. was called DeviceName, so you will want to change that with the field name with the unique values.

 

If you need to use more than one field to define a unique row, it would look something like this:

ForAll(
    colVerifiedDevices,
    Patch(
        Devices,
        LookUp(Devices, Field1 = colVerifiedDevices[@Field1] && Field2 = colVerifiedDevices[@Field2]), 
        {
            Name: User().FullName,
            Date: Now(),
            Status: "Confirmed"
        }
    )
);
Clear(colVerifiedDevices)

Just repeat the '&& Field# = colVerifiedDevices[@Field#]' for each additional field you need in there (where Field# is the column name of course).

 

One thing to note is the Clear(colVerifiedDevices) at the end of the ForAll Patch statement. This clears the collection out when the loop is done so those values aren't repeated.

 

I hope all of that makes sense but feel free to hit me up if it doesn't!

View solution in original post

Absolutely amazing - thank you so so much.😀

wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

@JerryH Happy to be able to help out! If I can be of assistance in the future, feel free to tag me in the post.

Helpful resources

Announcements
UG GA Amplification 768x460.png

Launching new user group features

Learn how to create your own user groups today!

Community Connections 768x460.jpg

Community & How To Videos

Check out the new Power Platform Community Connections gallery!

M365 768x460.jpg

Microsoft 365 Collaboration Conference | December 7–9, 2021

Join us, in-person, December 7–9 in Las Vegas, for the largest gathering of the Microsoft community in the world.

Top Solution Authors
Top Kudoed Authors
Users online (3,608)