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seadude
Memorable Member
Memorable Member

SQL HELP:

Hey everyone, @wyotim, this is your area of expertise isn't it?

 

My first time SQL app and am having a challenge:

  • 5 tables. Each with a Primary Key
  • Foreign Key relationships between tables as shown below
  • patchError.png
  • The issue:
    • When I Patch the readingTable, which has a Foreign Key dependency on the dateTable, I get the error:
    • "The INSERT statement conflicted with the FOREIGN KEY constraint named "FK_reading_to_dateTable". The error occured on database-x, table-y, column "dateId".
  • The problem appears to be that I'm patching the readingTable BEFORE the dateTable has any data in it.
  • I made the dateId column in the readingTable allow null, but still wouldn't Patch.

How do I Patch a table that has a foreign key dependency on another table that has not been patched yet?

 

What am I missing?

 

Thank you

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
seadude
Memorable Member
Memorable Member

Hey buddy! I got it (following your lead of course:) )

 

Two of the tables (redacted, sorry) are for adding new items in the app, not really part of this Patch so I left them out.

 

For the other three tables, you were right @wyotim, it was all about the Patch order and grabbing the PK's after each Patch and slapping them into the FK of the following table. I used the Last() function for this.

 

Example:

//Patch values into dateTable
Patch('[dbo].[dateTable]',
    Defaults('[dbo].[dateTable]'),
        {
            siteId: varSiteID,
            readingDate: Now()
        }
);

//Patch values into readingTable
Patch('[dbo].[readingTable]',
    Defaults(
        '[dbo].[readingTable]'),
        {
            dateId: Last('[dbo].[dateTable]').dateId, <--BINGO
            unitNum: 1, 
            xzyName: 1,
            zyxNum: 1,
            xkdFactor: 1, 
            supplyXya: 1, 
            supplyUio: 1, 
            sortNum: 1,
            currentUys: 1,
            avgJJk: 1,
            prevLLk: 1,
            readingNotes: "This is awesome"
        }
);

//Patch values into the imageTable
ForAll(
    colImageGallery,
    Patch(
        '[dbo].[imageTable]',
            Defaults('[dbo].[imageTable]'),
        {
            readingId: Last('[dbo].[readingTable]').readingId, <--BINGO
            photo: image,
            photoNotes: " "
        }
    )
);

Woohoo! That one was not simple to find info on.

View solution in original post

wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

Apologies for the late reply!

What helped me the most with views was actually making reports in Power BI. Something about having Power Query to mash up data plus the model view so you can visualize the relationships really helped (and continues to help).

I agree with the “start with the query you want” advice but my variation on that would be to map out the resultant table you want. From their, I think about the main data point(s) I am after and how they relate to the other data needed to create the view due to PK/FK relationships, and then what kind of filtering I will want before and after the view is made (i.e. do I want to filter by an FK or date before the view is made to limit the size/scope of the created view and/or do I want to have the ability to filter by something that isn’t in the view currently and needs to be added for that purpose). Sometimes it is more straightforward and others it can be a bit tricky but I do think just jumping in and smashing data sets together is a great way to learn.

I also use SSMS, which has a pretty great way to make views. I assume most people use that too but it is worth mentioning just in case you aren’t.

I would be happy to post some examples of the views I have made of that would be helpful but I won’t be able to do so until late this week or early next. I am out of the office due to a (pre-planned) medical event for my wife. If I can expound on anything, let me know and I will be happy to do so!

View solution in original post

25 REPLIES 25
seadude
Memorable Member
Memorable Member

Do I have to do this? https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/relational-databases/tables/disable-foreign-key-constraints-wit....

This kind of looks like disabling the FK altogether.

wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

While I am not an expert in SQL, that article is what I would suggest. The problem is that the PK/FK constraint is actually doing it’s job by making it so you can’t have a child record without a parent.

Disabling the constraint doesn’t cause too many issues if you are in the PowerApps/Power BI feedback loop. It is easy to relate the tables in either one using filters (or just telling Power bI they are related in the data model).

The main issue I would see is the possibility of orphaned records (if you were to delete a parent record, the child records would still be around). One nice thing about the PK/FK restraint is that it can prevent this or give options in how to handle it, like removing all the child records if the parent record is deleted.

Beyond that, I don’t know what other issues may arise, especially in any other ways you might be connecting to and using that data, so hopefully someone with more knowledge will chime in.

Is there a reason why you have foreign keys without a primary? Is it that you are just building the data set or something like that?
seadude
Memorable Member
Memorable Member

Thanks for the detailed response @wyotim. I just realized I have "CASCADE" set for each FK. I went in and set that at "NO". We'll see if that works.

 

RE: Why FK's and no PK's?:

  • Each table does have a PK.
  • Are you seeing something in the table that looks incorrect?

This is my first SQL rodeo, so definitely not 100% solid on what I'm doing.

wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

I wasn't too clear in my question. I was more wondering why you would have child records (by using an FK reference) but no parent records (the PK used as an FK in the child table). 

 

To analogize, it is like the parent table is a record of transactions (like grocery receipts with customer names, date/times, store number, etc.) and the child table is a record of items within each transaction (milk, eggs, etc.). It seemed like you were adding items but didn't have a transaction to tie them to. Does that sound right or am I misunderstanding?

seadude
Memorable Member
Memorable Member

You have it correct. How do I patch all 5 tables at once so that the FK's work? I think thats my problem. Chicken and egg thing.

wyotim
Resident Rockstar
Resident Rockstar

You will need to patch them in order of dependency I think. So siteTable before dateTable, dateTable before readingTable, etc. And you will need to have a way to grab the PK from the parent so the child can use it as an FK.

seadude
Memorable Member
Memorable Member

Hm. That feels tricky. How are other people patching multiple SQL tables that have FK dependencies? I see Paul O'Flaherty patching away on SQL YouTube videos. but no details on how to setup Looks like he's using SQL Views to display information. Not sure whether he is writing to the Views (or if that is even possible)

 

I deleted all FK dependencies for now to test patching individually. Maybe i'll bring in one at a time now and test your idea.

 

Thanks for the insights @wyotim, its always nice working with ya!

seadude
Memorable Member
Memorable Member

OOOOooohhh.... what do you think of this?

 

Conditions for Modifying Data in Partitioned Views

The value being inserted into the partitioning column should satisfy at least one of the underlying constraints; otherwise, the insert action will fail with a constraint violation. 
seadude
Memorable Member
Memorable Member

Hey buddy! I got it (following your lead of course:) )

 

Two of the tables (redacted, sorry) are for adding new items in the app, not really part of this Patch so I left them out.

 

For the other three tables, you were right @wyotim, it was all about the Patch order and grabbing the PK's after each Patch and slapping them into the FK of the following table. I used the Last() function for this.

 

Example:

//Patch values into dateTable
Patch('[dbo].[dateTable]',
    Defaults('[dbo].[dateTable]'),
        {
            siteId: varSiteID,
            readingDate: Now()
        }
);

//Patch values into readingTable
Patch('[dbo].[readingTable]',
    Defaults(
        '[dbo].[readingTable]'),
        {
            dateId: Last('[dbo].[dateTable]').dateId, <--BINGO
            unitNum: 1, 
            xzyName: 1,
            zyxNum: 1,
            xkdFactor: 1, 
            supplyXya: 1, 
            supplyUio: 1, 
            sortNum: 1,
            currentUys: 1,
            avgJJk: 1,
            prevLLk: 1,
            readingNotes: "This is awesome"
        }
);

//Patch values into the imageTable
ForAll(
    colImageGallery,
    Patch(
        '[dbo].[imageTable]',
            Defaults('[dbo].[imageTable]'),
        {
            readingId: Last('[dbo].[readingTable]').readingId, <--BINGO
            photo: image,
            photoNotes: " "
        }
    )
);

Woohoo! That one was not simple to find info on.

View solution in original post

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