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Ab3l
Helper I
Helper I

Is it really free and for long? ūü§Į

Can anyone tell me what's the limitation on a free Microsoft power automate account? 

 

I've searched on the internet, but there are different answers which lead to more confusion. Somewhere says we can do only 750 tasks a month, somewhere I read, there is some hourly based limit. 

 

And is the limit the same for office 365 users?

 

P.S: I am talking about the web version, not the desktop app.

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poweractivate
Super User
Super User

@Ab3l 

 

The main difference is actually that you don't get access to Premium functionality in the Free plan. By this I mean the Premium connectors cannot be used in the Free plan.  Please note that the possibility not to use Premium is also even in some paid plans - only some specific paid plans have access to Premium Flow Actions / Triggers.

 

There are also Premium Connectors in Power Apps as well and a similar caveat applies there too.

 

There are some important subtle limitations as well though, I see that you state some places say 750 "tasks" a month (not sure what that is, but that sounds like Flow Run billing, something which doesn't apply anymore from a while now) - and 'hourly based limits' in other places.

Regarding clarification the more subtle limitations, here are the details:

 

Free plans have 'Low' Performance Profile. on the Flows. I'll detail what this might mean to you with practical differences in the limits, later in the post. Notice how according to the below reference, Power Automate Plan 1 and Power Apps Plan 1, as well as Microsoft 365 Plans, and all trials, have Low performance profile as well, even if they are paid plans. 

 

These differences would apply Per-Flow I believe.

 

Power Apps Plan 2 (per user), Power Automate Plan 2 are the main plans which jump it up to MediumLow2.

 

Notice that  there is a 'Medium' for some of the Flows. Please note that even in the Free Plan, it might be possible that some Flows which fit that specific criteria might still run on 'Medium' even in Free plan.

 

From Limits for automated, scheduled, and instant flows - Perfomance Profiles (docs.microsoft.com) 

Performance profiles

Flows have different limits depending on their performance profile. There are five possible values, depending on the flow owner's plan.

PERFORMANCE PROFILES
Performance profile Plans
Low - Free
- Microsoft 365 plans
- Power Apps Plan 1, Per App plans
- Power Automate Plan 1
- All license trials
MediumLow1 - Power Apps Plan 2, Power Apps per user plan
- Power Automate Plan 2, Power Automate per user, Power Automate per user with Attended RPA plans
- Dynamics 365 Team Member
MediumLow2 - Dynamics 365 Enterprise plans, Dynamics 365 Professional plans
- Dynamics 365 non-licensed users, application users, users with special free licenses
Medium - All instant flows, such as flows with Button or Power Apps triggers, or child flows
High - Power Automate per flow plan

 

 

NOTE: In the above, Microsoft 365 plan where it says "Low" would likely also be where "Office 365 plan" falls under as well and would be the same as that one, I believe.

 

If you have the Power Automate plan that is dedicated and has to be paid for each Flow individually, that gets High Performance Profile for all actions. Usually, you know when you really need this, and I believe it's generally for Flows that use up among the top single digit percentage of Microsoft resources of all customers - in this case, the limits are easily exceeded, and it is obvious that this plan is needed or the Flow will either be very slow or even stop working altogether as it is for a very resource-intensive use case.

 

Note that in some cases, Microsoft is applying the limits dynamically based on usage and the limit is a reasonable approximation. If you go over slightly, you might be fine and nothing might happen. If you go over a lot, you might be notified by Microsoft, and your resources may even stop working altogether if the usage is especially higher than the limits.

 

Ok,  so to simplify things, let's basically go over what might be different about Low and MediumLow2 (and maybe High) since that might make things more clear.

 

Here are some limits which specifically are different for the performance profiles, and sometimes, by Plan too:

 

 

Expiration limits

Limits on how long flows will remain turned on before they expire and get turned off

EXPIRATION LIMITS
Name Limit Notes
Flows with errors 14 days A cloud flow that has a trigger or actions which fail continuously will be turned off. Fix your trigger or actions and turn on the flow.
Not triggered (dormant) flows 90 days for Free, Trial, Community and Microsoft 365 Plans.No expiration limit for all others A cloud flow that has no successful triggers will expire and be turned off. After 90 days of inactivity, the flow creator will receive an email. If no action is taken in next 30 days, the flow will be systematically turned off and the creator will be notified in an email. For enterprise scenarios, we recommend you buy a standalone Power Automate license listed in Pricing article to ensure your flow isn‚Äôt turned off due to inactivity. You can turn your cloud flows back on anytime.
Consistently throttled flows 14 days A cloud flow that is consistently throttled for 14 days will be turned off. The flow creator will get an email when the flow starts throttling and when the flow is turned off. For enterprise scenarios, we recommend you buy a standalone Power Automate license listed in Pricing article to get higher action limits. You can turn your cloud flows back on anytime.

 

Notice the specific difference here is not by Performance Profile but by plan.

Basically, Flows turn off after 90 days if they are not triggered for 90 continuous days automatically on the Free, Trial, Community and Microsoft 365 Plans. Note, they are not deleted, just turned off.

To avoid this behavior, it is necessary to have another plan. Please note that even in the above plans, the Flow might be manually turned on again, but if it is undesirable to manually turn on an inactive Flow, such as for instance, if it is intentionally inactive for 90 days or more at a time, and at the 91st day the Flow was expected to work, and manual intervention periodically is not desired, then one of the plans other than the ones in bold must be purchased, as there is no such expiration limit on those plans.

 

 

Let's get into Action request limits.

 

An action includes whenever you go into Flow Run History and see a Green Checkmark or a Red exclamation Point - that includes the run of the Trigger itself, and the run of every Action block - each time this happens, this is known as an Action. In some cases, if the connector retried something, each of those retries is an Action Request.  Please note this is not meant to be exhaustive, and it is possible that some Connectors single Action use more than one Action request in some cases. Please note that each iteration of an Apply to Each counts. For example, suppose an Apply to each with 5 Compose Actions (assume all of them are on the same branch and are always run) and 10 iterations. That Flow Run would count as not 5 Action requests, but actually, 50 Action requests.  Please also note, this is incurred for every single Flow run and not for the Flow itself. If the above Flow was run 5 times, that would be approx. 250 Action requests incurred in total (probably a bit more than that since the Trigger itself probably counts as one, etc.)

 

See below reference:

 

Action request limits

There are limits to the number of actions a cloud flow can run. These runs are counted for all types of actions, including connector actions, HTTP actions, and built-in actions from initializing variables to a simple compose action. Both succeeded and failed actions count towards these limits. Additionally, retries and additional requests from pagination count as action runs. You can see the number of actions your flow has run by selecting Analytics from the flow details page and looking at the Actions tab.

ACTION REQUEST LIMITS
Name Plan limit Interim limit Notes
Actions per 5 minutes 100,000 n/a Distribute the workload across more than one flow as necessary.
Actions per 24 hours 2,000 for Low, 5,000 for MediumLow1, 20,000 for MediumLow2, 25,000 for Medium, and 15,000 for High 10,000 for Low, 25,000 for MediumLow1, 100,000 for MediumLow2, 125,000 for Medium and 500,000 for High Because of the current transition period (in the year of 2020) these limits are less strict than the values called out in the requests limits and allocations document. These limits represent approximations of how many requests will be allowed daily. They are not not guarantees. Actual amounts may be smaller, but will be greater than the documented requests limits and allocations during the transition period. These limits will change after the transition period ends. Distribute the workload across more than one flow as necessary.
Concurrent outbound calls 500 for Low, 2,500 for all others

 

 

Taking the above table as example, a specific Flow could only have about 2,000 Action requests per 24 hours (across all Flow runs in that 24 hour period for that specific Flow) - e.g. under Free plan. whereas that same Flow would be able to have about 5,000 om MediumLow1 (i.e. if having the PowerApps Plan 2 per-user plan, for example). However, please keep in mind the below too:

 

 

Please note there is, in addition to the above, also a specific limit applying to entire Tenant and per-user, that means it applies to ALL Flow Action Requests taken together, plus ALL API requests generated by ALL Canvas Apps taken together, plus ALL API requests generated by usage of Model Driven Apps, plus ALL API requests generated by usage of Dynamics 365 products (including just using them out of the box), and any other related activity. 

 

These are probably the main limits to keep in mind:

 

The limits below can be one of the reasons to need to purchase a per-Flow plan for example, which I believe would not be subject to those specific limits below:

Request limits based on user licenses

All the users of Microsoft Power Platform have limits on the number of requests based on the license they are assigned. The following table defines the number of requests a user can make in a 24-hour period:

REQUEST LIMITS BASED ON USER LICENSES
User licenses Number of API requests / 24 hours
Dynamics 365 Enterprise applications1 20,000
Dynamics 365 Professional2 10,000
Dynamics 365 Team Member 5,000
Power Apps per user plan3 5,000
Power Automate per user plan3 5,000
Office licenses (that include Power Apps, Power Automate, or Power Virtual Agents)4 2,000
Power Apps per app plan 1,000 per app pass
Non-licensed users See Requests limits not based on licensed users or flows below

1 Dynamics 365 Enterprise applications include Dynamics 365 Sales Enterprise, Dynamics 365 Customer Service Enterprise, Dynamics 365 Field Service, Dynamics 365 Project Service Automation, Dynamics 365 Commerce, Dynamics 365 HR, Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement plan, Dynamics 365 Finance, Dynamics 365 Project Operations, and Dynamics 365 Supply Chain Management.

2 Dynamics 365 Professional includes Dynamics 365 Sales Professional, Dynamics 365 Customer Service Professional.

3 The per user plans include the previous Plan 1 and Plan 2.

4 See Appendix B for Microsoft 365 licenses that include Power Apps and Power Automate capabilities in the Licensing Guide.

If a user has multiple plans assigned from different product lines, the total number of requests allowed would be the sum of requests allocated to each license type. For example, if a user has both a Dynamics 365 Customer Service Enterprise license as well as a Power Apps per user license then that user will have a total of 20000 + 5000 = 25000 requests available per 24 hours.

If a user has multiple licenses allocated within the same product line, for example if a user has a Dynamics 365 Customer Service Enterprise license as the base license and a Dynamics 365 Sales Enterprise license attached, the total number of requests would be what is provided by the base license - Dynamics 365 Customer Service.

 

 

So in the example of the above, a Flow that is owned by a specific User could only run at most about 5,000 action requests (maybe even less, if they also user Power Apps Canvas, etc.) across ALL Flows in a 24 hour period. In order for this limit to be higher, you can see references at bottom of post of two ways to raise this.

 

Also in case it helps:

What is a Microsoft Power Platform request?

Requests in Microsoft Power Platform consist of various actions that a user makes across various products. At a high level, below is what constitute an API request:

  • Power Apps ‚Äď all API requests to connectors and Microsoft Dataverse.
  • Power Automate ‚Äď all API requests to connectors, process advisor analysis, HTTP actions, and built-in actions from initializing variables to a simple compose action. Both succeeded and failed actions count towards these limits. Additionally, retries and other requests from pagination count as action executions as well.
  • Power Virtual Agents - API requests (or calls) to Power Automate flows from within a chatbot conversation.
  • Dataverse (formerly Common Data Service) ‚Äď all create, read, update, and delete (CRUD), assign, and share operations including user-driven and internal system requests required to complete CRUD transactions, and special operations like share or assign. These can be from any client or application and using any endpoint (SOAP or REST). These include, but are not limited to, plug-ins, classic workflows, and custom controls making the earlier-mentioned operations.

 

For Dataverse, there is a small set of system internal operations that are excluded from limits, such as login, logout, and system metadata operations.

 

 

------

 

 

I would advise you not to worry about it unless you are seeing yourself hitting above the limits, which your admin can check in the Power Platform Admin Center

 

There is a way to raise the tenant limit, like this:

 

2 ways to raise the tenant limits:

 

Power Apps and Power Automate capacity add-on

A Power Apps and Power Automate capacity add-on allows customers to increase the limits for a given user. These will be assignable to any user who has a Power Apps, Power Automate, or applicable Dynamics 365 license.

Each capacity add-on raises the request limits by another 10,000 per 24 hours. Multiple capacity add-ons can also be assigned to the same user.

 

 

Another point to know is "non-interactive" users have their own "shared pool capacity" that is completely separate from the regular users, the whole pool is shared across all these users, but this quota won't even be touched unless you use one of these specific kind of users only - so this can be an option for you to create one of these kinds of users depending on the scenario. (though they cannot be logged into by a user, but by a "bot" or program-atically only):

 

Here are some more details:

Requests limits not based on licensed users or flows

Dataverse enables you to have identities that do not require any user license to interact with the service. There are four types of these users:

Additionally there are special free ($0) licenses, which are used to interact with Dynamics 365 applications like Dynamics 365 Marketing. See How Marketing is licensed.

For these identities, every tenant will get base request capacity per tenant that can only be used by these users and not by users with standard licenses.

This base request capacity is based on the type of subscription, as follows:

  1. If a tenant has at least one Dynamics 365 enterprise subscription, they will get 100,000 requests per 24 hours.
  2. If a tenant has at least one Dynamics 365 professional subscription, they will get 50,000 requests per 24 hours.
  3. If a tenant has at least one Microsoft Power Apps or Power Automate subscription, they will get 25,000 requests per 24 hours.

If a tenant has multiple types of subscriptions, their base request capacity will use the subscription with the larger number of requests. For example, if a customer has both Dynamics 365 Customer Service (100,000 requests) and Power Apps per user (25,000 requests) subscriptions, their base request capacity will be 100,000 requests per 24 hours.

Base request capacity is defined at the tenant level and can only be used by non-licensed users, application users, and users who have free ($0) licenses.

After base request capacity is exhausted, customers can increase this capacity by purchasing a Power Apps and Power Automate capacity add-on.

The Power Automate per flow plan allows capacity to be specifically reserved for a single flow, irrespective of the owner of the flow. Each flow assigned to the per flow plan gets 15,000 per 24 hours. This does not use the base request capacity at the tenant level.

 

 

Please note the Non-Interactive user might be for Dataverse related operations only, I am not sure they work for Power Automate. The main option for Power Automate is likely to purchase the capacity add-on. For Flows, depending on scenario the per-Flow plan may be applicable as well.

 

 

Check if it helps.

 

Here are some other Performance Profile related limits to keep in mind:

(from https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/power-automate/limits-and-config#action-request-limits)

 

 

Apply to each array items 5,000 for Low, 100,000 for all others This limit describes the highest number of array items that a "apply to each" loop can process.
To filter larger arrays, you can use the query action.
Split on items - 5,000 for Low without trigger concurrency
- 100,000 for all others without trigger concurrency
- 100 with trigger concurrency
For triggers that return an array, you can specify an expression that uses a 'SplitOn' property that splits or debatches array items into multiple workflow instances for processing, rather than use a "Foreach" loop. This expression references the array to use for creating and running a workflow instance for each array item.
Note: When concurrency is turned on, the Split on limit is reduced to 100 items.
     
Paginated items 5,000 for Low, 100,000 for all others To process more items, trigger multiple flow runs over your data.

 

 

Read calls per 5 minutes 6,000 for Low, 60,000 for all others This limit applies to calls that get the raw inputs and outputs from a cloud flow's run history. You can distribute the workload across more than one flow as necessary.
Invoke calls per 5 minutes 4,500 for Low, 45,000 for all others You can distribute workload across more t
CONTENT THROUGHPUT LIMITS
Name Limit Notes
Content throughput per 5 minutes 600 MB for Low, 6 GB for all others You can distribute workload across more than one flow as necessary.
Content throughput per 24 hours 1 GB for Low, 10 GB for MediumLow1, MediumLow2 and Medium, 50 GB for High You can distribute workload across more than one flow as necessary.

 

 

 

Check if it helps.

 

Also regarding Power Automate specifically, and regarding the per-Flow plan - you may want to check with Microsoft, but I believe that if you use a per-Flow plan, the capacity for that specific Flow, which is 15,000 Action requests per 24 hours, is dedicated to that Flow and in that specific case only will not be applied any tenant limits to it, only the Power Automate related limits for High might be applied to it.

 

For most of your use cases, such as if you are experimenting with it, Free Power Automate / Microsoft 365/Office365 Power Automate could be good enough for you. If the trial has not been used up, you can also start a trial of it.

 

Please note that if you are developing or testing, you can access for dev/testing (but not use in production) a Community Plan for free and see if that helps a.... You cannot share Flows or do anything in there that should be done in production environment, and it is separate, but it is also free.  There is some confusion as to whether the Community Plan allows use of Premium Triggers and Actions from Power Automate (such as the HTTP Action, for example, which as of this writing is a premium acion), and not just Premium Connectors from Power Apps (i.e. Power Apps Canvas Apps). Although I am not 100% sure on it, I believe the answer is, yes you can use Premium Triggers and Actions from Power Automate in the Developer plan - if it does not work try it on https://us.flow.microsoft.com/ URL to access it, instead of make.powerapps.com (after getting the developer plan) and see if you can use Premium connector. Please note that if you somehow get anything to work in a Developer plan, such as including Premium Triggers and Actions in the Community Plan that way. Even if you do not share the Flow with users (which the system will prevent you from doing) - you are not to use it in production (even if you somehow figure out how to use it in production with the restrictions) without buying a plan (or you can use Power Automate Free, Office 365 or whichever plan you already have without Premium connectors and Premium Triggers/Actions). If you use a Developer plan in actual production scenario somehow, your account may be terminated. Make sure to use it only for development purposes. Note that the developer plan has some specific restrictions that the system won't let you do, such as sharing Flows, etc. which will probably make it very hard to use in production anyway - but even if you find a way around it, make sure never to use the free Community plan for production.

 

 

For most cases, you might not come close to these limits by the way. For scenarios where you do come to the limits, I recommend capacity add-on, and/or, even a Per-Flow plan add-on depending on the scenario of your Flows.

 

 

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poweractivate
Super User
Super User

@Ab3l 

 

The main difference is actually that you don't get access to Premium functionality in the Free plan. By this I mean the Premium connectors cannot be used in the Free plan.  Please note that the possibility not to use Premium is also even in some paid plans - only some specific paid plans have access to Premium Flow Actions / Triggers.

 

There are also Premium Connectors in Power Apps as well and a similar caveat applies there too.

 

There are some important subtle limitations as well though, I see that you state some places say 750 "tasks" a month (not sure what that is, but that sounds like Flow Run billing, something which doesn't apply anymore from a while now) - and 'hourly based limits' in other places.

Regarding clarification the more subtle limitations, here are the details:

 

Free plans have 'Low' Performance Profile. on the Flows. I'll detail what this might mean to you with practical differences in the limits, later in the post. Notice how according to the below reference, Power Automate Plan 1 and Power Apps Plan 1, as well as Microsoft 365 Plans, and all trials, have Low performance profile as well, even if they are paid plans. 

 

These differences would apply Per-Flow I believe.

 

Power Apps Plan 2 (per user), Power Automate Plan 2 are the main plans which jump it up to MediumLow2.

 

Notice that  there is a 'Medium' for some of the Flows. Please note that even in the Free Plan, it might be possible that some Flows which fit that specific criteria might still run on 'Medium' even in Free plan.

 

From Limits for automated, scheduled, and instant flows - Perfomance Profiles (docs.microsoft.com) 

Performance profiles

Flows have different limits depending on their performance profile. There are five possible values, depending on the flow owner's plan.

PERFORMANCE PROFILES
Performance profile Plans
Low - Free
- Microsoft 365 plans
- Power Apps Plan 1, Per App plans
- Power Automate Plan 1
- All license trials
MediumLow1 - Power Apps Plan 2, Power Apps per user plan
- Power Automate Plan 2, Power Automate per user, Power Automate per user with Attended RPA plans
- Dynamics 365 Team Member
MediumLow2 - Dynamics 365 Enterprise plans, Dynamics 365 Professional plans
- Dynamics 365 non-licensed users, application users, users with special free licenses
Medium - All instant flows, such as flows with Button or Power Apps triggers, or child flows
High - Power Automate per flow plan

 

 

NOTE: In the above, Microsoft 365 plan where it says "Low" would likely also be where "Office 365 plan" falls under as well and would be the same as that one, I believe.

 

If you have the Power Automate plan that is dedicated and has to be paid for each Flow individually, that gets High Performance Profile for all actions. Usually, you know when you really need this, and I believe it's generally for Flows that use up among the top single digit percentage of Microsoft resources of all customers - in this case, the limits are easily exceeded, and it is obvious that this plan is needed or the Flow will either be very slow or even stop working altogether as it is for a very resource-intensive use case.

 

Note that in some cases, Microsoft is applying the limits dynamically based on usage and the limit is a reasonable approximation. If you go over slightly, you might be fine and nothing might happen. If you go over a lot, you might be notified by Microsoft, and your resources may even stop working altogether if the usage is especially higher than the limits.

 

Ok,  so to simplify things, let's basically go over what might be different about Low and MediumLow2 (and maybe High) since that might make things more clear.

 

Here are some limits which specifically are different for the performance profiles, and sometimes, by Plan too:

 

 

Expiration limits

Limits on how long flows will remain turned on before they expire and get turned off

EXPIRATION LIMITS
Name Limit Notes
Flows with errors 14 days A cloud flow that has a trigger or actions which fail continuously will be turned off. Fix your trigger or actions and turn on the flow.
Not triggered (dormant) flows 90 days for Free, Trial, Community and Microsoft 365 Plans.No expiration limit for all others A cloud flow that has no successful triggers will expire and be turned off. After 90 days of inactivity, the flow creator will receive an email. If no action is taken in next 30 days, the flow will be systematically turned off and the creator will be notified in an email. For enterprise scenarios, we recommend you buy a standalone Power Automate license listed in Pricing article to ensure your flow isn‚Äôt turned off due to inactivity. You can turn your cloud flows back on anytime.
Consistently throttled flows 14 days A cloud flow that is consistently throttled for 14 days will be turned off. The flow creator will get an email when the flow starts throttling and when the flow is turned off. For enterprise scenarios, we recommend you buy a standalone Power Automate license listed in Pricing article to get higher action limits. You can turn your cloud flows back on anytime.

 

Notice the specific difference here is not by Performance Profile but by plan.

Basically, Flows turn off after 90 days if they are not triggered for 90 continuous days automatically on the Free, Trial, Community and Microsoft 365 Plans. Note, they are not deleted, just turned off.

To avoid this behavior, it is necessary to have another plan. Please note that even in the above plans, the Flow might be manually turned on again, but if it is undesirable to manually turn on an inactive Flow, such as for instance, if it is intentionally inactive for 90 days or more at a time, and at the 91st day the Flow was expected to work, and manual intervention periodically is not desired, then one of the plans other than the ones in bold must be purchased, as there is no such expiration limit on those plans.

 

 

Let's get into Action request limits.

 

An action includes whenever you go into Flow Run History and see a Green Checkmark or a Red exclamation Point - that includes the run of the Trigger itself, and the run of every Action block - each time this happens, this is known as an Action. In some cases, if the connector retried something, each of those retries is an Action Request.  Please note this is not meant to be exhaustive, and it is possible that some Connectors single Action use more than one Action request in some cases. Please note that each iteration of an Apply to Each counts. For example, suppose an Apply to each with 5 Compose Actions (assume all of them are on the same branch and are always run) and 10 iterations. That Flow Run would count as not 5 Action requests, but actually, 50 Action requests.  Please also note, this is incurred for every single Flow run and not for the Flow itself. If the above Flow was run 5 times, that would be approx. 250 Action requests incurred in total (probably a bit more than that since the Trigger itself probably counts as one, etc.)

 

See below reference:

 

Action request limits

There are limits to the number of actions a cloud flow can run. These runs are counted for all types of actions, including connector actions, HTTP actions, and built-in actions from initializing variables to a simple compose action. Both succeeded and failed actions count towards these limits. Additionally, retries and additional requests from pagination count as action runs. You can see the number of actions your flow has run by selecting Analytics from the flow details page and looking at the Actions tab.

ACTION REQUEST LIMITS
Name Plan limit Interim limit Notes
Actions per 5 minutes 100,000 n/a Distribute the workload across more than one flow as necessary.
Actions per 24 hours 2,000 for Low, 5,000 for MediumLow1, 20,000 for MediumLow2, 25,000 for Medium, and 15,000 for High 10,000 for Low, 25,000 for MediumLow1, 100,000 for MediumLow2, 125,000 for Medium and 500,000 for High Because of the current transition period (in the year of 2020) these limits are less strict than the values called out in the requests limits and allocations document. These limits represent approximations of how many requests will be allowed daily. They are not not guarantees. Actual amounts may be smaller, but will be greater than the documented requests limits and allocations during the transition period. These limits will change after the transition period ends. Distribute the workload across more than one flow as necessary.
Concurrent outbound calls 500 for Low, 2,500 for all others

 

 

Taking the above table as example, a specific Flow could only have about 2,000 Action requests per 24 hours (across all Flow runs in that 24 hour period for that specific Flow) - e.g. under Free plan. whereas that same Flow would be able to have about 5,000 om MediumLow1 (i.e. if having the PowerApps Plan 2 per-user plan, for example). However, please keep in mind the below too:

 

 

Please note there is, in addition to the above, also a specific limit applying to entire Tenant and per-user, that means it applies to ALL Flow Action Requests taken together, plus ALL API requests generated by ALL Canvas Apps taken together, plus ALL API requests generated by usage of Model Driven Apps, plus ALL API requests generated by usage of Dynamics 365 products (including just using them out of the box), and any other related activity. 

 

These are probably the main limits to keep in mind:

 

The limits below can be one of the reasons to need to purchase a per-Flow plan for example, which I believe would not be subject to those specific limits below:

Request limits based on user licenses

All the users of Microsoft Power Platform have limits on the number of requests based on the license they are assigned. The following table defines the number of requests a user can make in a 24-hour period:

REQUEST LIMITS BASED ON USER LICENSES
User licenses Number of API requests / 24 hours
Dynamics 365 Enterprise applications1 20,000
Dynamics 365 Professional2 10,000
Dynamics 365 Team Member 5,000
Power Apps per user plan3 5,000
Power Automate per user plan3 5,000
Office licenses (that include Power Apps, Power Automate, or Power Virtual Agents)4 2,000
Power Apps per app plan 1,000 per app pass
Non-licensed users See Requests limits not based on licensed users or flows below

1 Dynamics 365 Enterprise applications include Dynamics 365 Sales Enterprise, Dynamics 365 Customer Service Enterprise, Dynamics 365 Field Service, Dynamics 365 Project Service Automation, Dynamics 365 Commerce, Dynamics 365 HR, Dynamics 365 Customer Engagement plan, Dynamics 365 Finance, Dynamics 365 Project Operations, and Dynamics 365 Supply Chain Management.

2 Dynamics 365 Professional includes Dynamics 365 Sales Professional, Dynamics 365 Customer Service Professional.

3 The per user plans include the previous Plan 1 and Plan 2.

4 See Appendix B for Microsoft 365 licenses that include Power Apps and Power Automate capabilities in the Licensing Guide.

If a user has multiple plans assigned from different product lines, the total number of requests allowed would be the sum of requests allocated to each license type. For example, if a user has both a Dynamics 365 Customer Service Enterprise license as well as a Power Apps per user license then that user will have a total of 20000 + 5000 = 25000 requests available per 24 hours.

If a user has multiple licenses allocated within the same product line, for example if a user has a Dynamics 365 Customer Service Enterprise license as the base license and a Dynamics 365 Sales Enterprise license attached, the total number of requests would be what is provided by the base license - Dynamics 365 Customer Service.

 

 

So in the example of the above, a Flow that is owned by a specific User could only run at most about 5,000 action requests (maybe even less, if they also user Power Apps Canvas, etc.) across ALL Flows in a 24 hour period. In order for this limit to be higher, you can see references at bottom of post of two ways to raise this.

 

Also in case it helps:

What is a Microsoft Power Platform request?

Requests in Microsoft Power Platform consist of various actions that a user makes across various products. At a high level, below is what constitute an API request:

  • Power Apps ‚Äď all API requests to connectors and Microsoft Dataverse.
  • Power Automate ‚Äď all API requests to connectors, process advisor analysis, HTTP actions, and built-in actions from initializing variables to a simple compose action. Both succeeded and failed actions count towards these limits. Additionally, retries and other requests from pagination count as action executions as well.
  • Power Virtual Agents - API requests (or calls) to Power Automate flows from within a chatbot conversation.
  • Dataverse (formerly Common Data Service) ‚Äď all create, read, update, and delete (CRUD), assign, and share operations including user-driven and internal system requests required to complete CRUD transactions, and special operations like share or assign. These can be from any client or application and using any endpoint (SOAP or REST). These include, but are not limited to, plug-ins, classic workflows, and custom controls making the earlier-mentioned operations.

 

For Dataverse, there is a small set of system internal operations that are excluded from limits, such as login, logout, and system metadata operations.

 

 

------

 

 

I would advise you not to worry about it unless you are seeing yourself hitting above the limits, which your admin can check in the Power Platform Admin Center

 

There is a way to raise the tenant limit, like this:

 

2 ways to raise the tenant limits:

 

Power Apps and Power Automate capacity add-on

A Power Apps and Power Automate capacity add-on allows customers to increase the limits for a given user. These will be assignable to any user who has a Power Apps, Power Automate, or applicable Dynamics 365 license.

Each capacity add-on raises the request limits by another 10,000 per 24 hours. Multiple capacity add-ons can also be assigned to the same user.

 

 

Another point to know is "non-interactive" users have their own "shared pool capacity" that is completely separate from the regular users, the whole pool is shared across all these users, but this quota won't even be touched unless you use one of these specific kind of users only - so this can be an option for you to create one of these kinds of users depending on the scenario. (though they cannot be logged into by a user, but by a "bot" or program-atically only):

 

Here are some more details:

Requests limits not based on licensed users or flows

Dataverse enables you to have identities that do not require any user license to interact with the service. There are four types of these users:

Additionally there are special free ($0) licenses, which are used to interact with Dynamics 365 applications like Dynamics 365 Marketing. See How Marketing is licensed.

For these identities, every tenant will get base request capacity per tenant that can only be used by these users and not by users with standard licenses.

This base request capacity is based on the type of subscription, as follows:

  1. If a tenant has at least one Dynamics 365 enterprise subscription, they will get 100,000 requests per 24 hours.
  2. If a tenant has at least one Dynamics 365 professional subscription, they will get 50,000 requests per 24 hours.
  3. If a tenant has at least one Microsoft Power Apps or Power Automate subscription, they will get 25,000 requests per 24 hours.

If a tenant has multiple types of subscriptions, their base request capacity will use the subscription with the larger number of requests. For example, if a customer has both Dynamics 365 Customer Service (100,000 requests) and Power Apps per user (25,000 requests) subscriptions, their base request capacity will be 100,000 requests per 24 hours.

Base request capacity is defined at the tenant level and can only be used by non-licensed users, application users, and users who have free ($0) licenses.

After base request capacity is exhausted, customers can increase this capacity by purchasing a Power Apps and Power Automate capacity add-on.

The Power Automate per flow plan allows capacity to be specifically reserved for a single flow, irrespective of the owner of the flow. Each flow assigned to the per flow plan gets 15,000 per 24 hours. This does not use the base request capacity at the tenant level.

 

 

Please note the Non-Interactive user might be for Dataverse related operations only, I am not sure they work for Power Automate. The main option for Power Automate is likely to purchase the capacity add-on. For Flows, depending on scenario the per-Flow plan may be applicable as well.

 

 

Check if it helps.

 

Here are some other Performance Profile related limits to keep in mind:

(from https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/power-automate/limits-and-config#action-request-limits)

 

 

Apply to each array items 5,000 for Low, 100,000 for all others This limit describes the highest number of array items that a "apply to each" loop can process.
To filter larger arrays, you can use the query action.
Split on items - 5,000 for Low without trigger concurrency
- 100,000 for all others without trigger concurrency
- 100 with trigger concurrency
For triggers that return an array, you can specify an expression that uses a 'SplitOn' property that splits or debatches array items into multiple workflow instances for processing, rather than use a "Foreach" loop. This expression references the array to use for creating and running a workflow instance for each array item.
Note: When concurrency is turned on, the Split on limit is reduced to 100 items.
     
Paginated items 5,000 for Low, 100,000 for all others To process more items, trigger multiple flow runs over your data.

 

 

Read calls per 5 minutes 6,000 for Low, 60,000 for all others This limit applies to calls that get the raw inputs and outputs from a cloud flow's run history. You can distribute the workload across more than one flow as necessary.
Invoke calls per 5 minutes 4,500 for Low, 45,000 for all others You can distribute workload across more t
CONTENT THROUGHPUT LIMITS
Name Limit Notes
Content throughput per 5 minutes 600 MB for Low, 6 GB for all others You can distribute workload across more than one flow as necessary.
Content throughput per 24 hours 1 GB for Low, 10 GB for MediumLow1, MediumLow2 and Medium, 50 GB for High You can distribute workload across more than one flow as necessary.

 

 

 

Check if it helps.

 

Also regarding Power Automate specifically, and regarding the per-Flow plan - you may want to check with Microsoft, but I believe that if you use a per-Flow plan, the capacity for that specific Flow, which is 15,000 Action requests per 24 hours, is dedicated to that Flow and in that specific case only will not be applied any tenant limits to it, only the Power Automate related limits for High might be applied to it.

 

For most of your use cases, such as if you are experimenting with it, Free Power Automate / Microsoft 365/Office365 Power Automate could be good enough for you. If the trial has not been used up, you can also start a trial of it.

 

Please note that if you are developing or testing, you can access for dev/testing (but not use in production) a Community Plan for free and see if that helps a.... You cannot share Flows or do anything in there that should be done in production environment, and it is separate, but it is also free.  There is some confusion as to whether the Community Plan allows use of Premium Triggers and Actions from Power Automate (such as the HTTP Action, for example, which as of this writing is a premium acion), and not just Premium Connectors from Power Apps (i.e. Power Apps Canvas Apps). Although I am not 100% sure on it, I believe the answer is, yes you can use Premium Triggers and Actions from Power Automate in the Developer plan - if it does not work try it on https://us.flow.microsoft.com/ URL to access it, instead of make.powerapps.com (after getting the developer plan) and see if you can use Premium connector. Please note that if you somehow get anything to work in a Developer plan, such as including Premium Triggers and Actions in the Community Plan that way. Even if you do not share the Flow with users (which the system will prevent you from doing) - you are not to use it in production (even if you somehow figure out how to use it in production with the restrictions) without buying a plan (or you can use Power Automate Free, Office 365 or whichever plan you already have without Premium connectors and Premium Triggers/Actions). If you use a Developer plan in actual production scenario somehow, your account may be terminated. Make sure to use it only for development purposes. Note that the developer plan has some specific restrictions that the system won't let you do, such as sharing Flows, etc. which will probably make it very hard to use in production anyway - but even if you find a way around it, make sure never to use the free Community plan for production.

 

 

For most cases, you might not come close to these limits by the way. For scenarios where you do come to the limits, I recommend capacity add-on, and/or, even a Per-Flow plan add-on depending on the scenario of your Flows.

 

 

Man, Thanks for the detailed response! Thanks for the time! But I wish if Microsoft hasn't made the plans so complex. 

BTW, I've read your whole response, but I still got two doubts. Maybe it's too much to process on my little brain! ūüėÖ 

1. I am on an office 365 A1 Plus for Faculty plan, and here are the plan details. Can you tell me if I have any advantages over the free plan? 

2. I only run 3-4 flows, which have like 10 steps each. Do you think I may cross the limit anytime soon? 

 

PlansPlans

@Ab3l 

 

To summarize #1, and I'll come back to it further below, basically the most restrictive limit is the one to pay attention to first, and from table above, that would be the 2,000 API request per 24 hours per user.

 

Now going to your question #2, depends how often they run. From a surface look at it, I feel like It is unlikely you will cross the limit of even 2,000 API requests per 24 hours anytime soon, but it may also depend how often they are being run per day. If it is being run by multiple users, who is the user that uses it most and how often do they use it? To me it sounds like you will probably be within the limits, but keep in mind it may depend on how often the Flow is being run.

 

 

Basically the most restrictive limit is the one to pay attention to first, and from table above, that would be the 2,000 API request per 24 hours per user. Since some of these requests might also include just the using of the service (e.g. opening Outlook mailbox, etc.) (not 100% sure, but these might be included) - you should plan for using a bit less than that from Flow. Because operations that are done out of the box that involve API requests, like just using Office 365 itself, i.e. opening Outlook, etc. actually might also count towards the limit that is specifically about "API Requests in general" (the one that is usually the most restrictive per 24 hours of all the limits, that is not associated with Performance Profile but with the plan assigned to the user, and has to do with the "request capacity per user: as noted in big black text above to pay attention to the most). I am not 100% sure those requests count, but I believe they do just because the API request limit is, to my understanding any use of any API requests, even those done outside of Power Automate, and even those done by the native out of the box applications such as Outlook, Outlook Web, etc. I believe only some narrow set of operations are excluded from the count such as login, logout, but even for those, if the excluded-from-the-count features are used abnormally such as for abusive purposes, this will be noted regardless of it not counting towards the limit, and it is against the policy of Microsoft to do this and could result in adverse consequences.

 

Because API requests per user might include more than just Power Automate requests, such as even just using the product out of the box, this may be possibly a reason Microsoft might be more likely to enforce a soft-limit on it and is more likely to throttle resources, contact you, etc. if you are quite significantly over the limit. For this reason, it is probably a minority of customers who are affected by problems related to consuming more resources than they should be consuming. (Note, while this has been my experience - I do not know what Microsoft is or is not "likely" to do, and it is possible you will notice action right away for going over the limits even a little bit - so be careful anyway). however, it would be best to be prudent and stay within reasonable range of the limits, preferably under, as the enforcement mechanisms are being modified regularly and they may become more strict (or already be as such right now).

 

 

The advantages as per Performance Profile might be the same. Also, across all operations only 2,000 API requests may be done per 24 hours, across all Flows, by a single user (i.e. per-user), according to the tenant table above. However, consider this. A Power Automate Free plan may allow to use a SharePoint Connector - but without the Office 365 plan you have, you would not be able to use SharePoint, Project, Teams, not even Outlook, and so forth.  I do not recommend you use the Power Automate Free plan only, in any case, as it may not be possible to really use the platform. For example, the user will not be able to access SharePoint at all - Outlook at all - (not from UI, not from a Flow they own or even just run) and so forth.

 

One thing I wonder, and could not find even in the licensing guide (attached) is - what about a scenario where for some reason, the only plan one has on the account is Power Automate Free? This is really a theoretical scenario, because let's say one uses Power Automate for Office 365. Without an Office 365 plan of some kind, or some other plan, it is often not very practically possible to use Power Automate. However, it is theoretically possible. I believe there might be a limit and it might be even lower than 2,000 API requests per 24 hours, if Power Automate Free was the only plan assigned to that user, however, I am not sure and I only suspect this. If what I just said is true, like let's say the limit on Free is 200 API requests per 24 hours - then that would also be another somewhat significant difference as well. 

 

I can only note couple interesting things about Power Automate Free that I noticed:

 

1) It probably cannot be removed, according to this (docs.microsoft.com).

 

What is the Power Automate free license?

The Power Automate Free license is used only for tracking purposes. Enabling or disabling it has no effect on a user's ability to create flows. If you disable the Power Automate Free license, it becomes enabled again when a user logs in. This is the expected behavior.

 

and...

 

2) Someone made an issue on GitHub for this in 2020, asking a same kind of theoretical question 

 

I wouldn't have the answer to that theoretical question, but for most practical purposes, probably doesn't matter about the specific limit for Power Automate Free only. Besides, using Power Automate Free and literally nothing else, for any production scenario is not recommended (and may not even really be possible, frankly).

 

In short, I think you should be fine with what you have for the moment, though I am presuming some things - check on about how often those Flows are being run as well in case.

 

Check if it helps.

ArshUser
Helper II
Helper II

Hey @poweractivate

Thanks for the detailed responses above. They are quite helpful!.

 

I just wanted to ask one small thing. So you wrote "2,000 API request per 24 hours per user": for example I have a flow that I created on my ID (I am the owner of the flow) but someone else in the organization is trigger the flow, does that mean the 2K API request limit will be cutting down from that user's limit or mine?

 

PS: I have the Power Automate for Office 365 License (Office 365 E1).

 

It would be really helpful if you can help me with this. I have been so confused for so long!

Thanks in advance!

ArshUser
Helper II
Helper II

Hey @poweractivate ,

 

Sorry about not adding this question to my previous response but I had one more doubt.

 

You mentioned "a specific Flow could only have about 2,000 Action requests per 24 hours (across all Flow runs in that 24 hour period for that specific Flow) - e.g. under Free plan". => Does this mean the 2K limit is only for one flow? What if I have multiple flows , will I have a 2K limit for each flow?

 

Asking this question because then creating Child Flows might be helpful?

 

Thanks!

poweractivate
Super User
Super User

@ArshUser 

 

That might have been correct, except I don't think it is correct anymore today.

I don't think spreading across multiple Flows has any effect and it is a specific action request limit per user per 24 hours now.

Even if it does still apply, there is still a cap, and spreading the Flows out can only be a workaround up until the maximum specified action request limit that applies per user, per 24 hours.

As of late 2021, I think they are doing it this way now:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/power-platform/admin/power-automate-licensing/types#free-plan

Free plan

If you sign in with work or school email address, you get all Power Automate capabilities included in Office 365.

But if you have a non-business user account (such as an account that ends with @outlook.com or @gmail.com), you can still use Power Automate with the free plan. Go to Power Automate and then select Try free.

 Note

You cannot share flows when you use the free plan.

To know which users have the free plan, admins can go to the O365 Admin portal, sign in, select Billing > Licenses to see how many free licenses are assigned vs available.

 

Notice that the Power Automate free plan

and

Power Automate capabilities included in Office 365

 

are not the same license by the way.

 

and especially check this out:

 

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/power-platform/admin/api-request-limits-allocations#licensed-user-r...

 

Licensed user request limits

All the users of Microsoft Power Platform have limits on the number of requests based on the license they are assigned. The following table defines the number of requests a user can make in a 24-hour period:

 

LICENSED USER REQUEST LIMITS
Products Requests per paid license per 24 hours
Paid licensed users for Power Platform (excludes Power Apps per App, Power Automate per flow, and Power Virtual Agents) and Dynamics 365 excluding D365 Team Member140,000
Power Apps pay-as-you-go plan, and paid licensed users for Power Apps per app, Microsoft 365 apps with Power Platform access, and Dynamics 365 Team Member26,000
Power Automate per flow plan3, Power Virtual Agents base offer, and Power Virtual Agents add-on pack4250,000
Paid Power Apps Portals login200

 

This seems to be confirmed by this blog post as well: 

https://powerautomate.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/revised-power-platform-request-limits/ 

 

Rather than lowering the limits as some docs pages described, the limits were actually raised

 

"For example, the Power Automate per user plan is jumping from 5,000 requests per user per day to 40,000 requests per user per day. This is designed to be more than sufficient for the vast majority of customer scenarios."

 

I believe the bolded above table, 

6,000 requests per license per 24 hrs 

(regardless of whether from 1 Flow, or multiple Flows) is the one for the

Power Automate capabilities included in Office 365

 

I also believe (though am not 100% sure) that prior to this change, that 6,000 was only 2,000 before - so they raised it from 2,000 per user per 24 hrs to 6,000 per user per 24 hrs even for just the Office 365 use rights.

 

I think you really want to know the limits for this one though:

"you can still use Power Automate with the free plan"

 

I am not exactly clear on the limits of the Power Automate Free Plan.

 

I believe they might be the same as the ones above i.e. 6,000 requests per license per 24 hrs. 

However, these two licenses are not the same:

Power Automate capabilities included in Office 365

and

Power Automate free

 

I would encourage you check with Microsoft about the exact limits of the "Power Automate Free" plan. I am not really able to find out with enough certainty to give you a really good answer on it.

 

Make sure when you check with them, you specify that you don't want to know the limits of the Office 365 plan, or the "trial limits" (the trial limits are just the same as the paid license for the trial duration), or the "Developer plan" (you get almost everything in the developer plan for free except sharing things and it is not allowed for production use).

You instead want to know the action request limits for Power Automate Free specifically.

 

There is some confusion that Power Automate Free does not exist anymore.

That was a long time ago, and that had to do with the per-flow-run billing model on the per-user plans, changing to the per-action-request model - and this happened quite a while ago now. Even after this change, Power Automate "Free" still existed even when per-flow-run model model changed to per-action-request model.

Power Automate is indeed free.

 

Now, it is more "free" than it ever was before - so much so, that nobody can stop you from using it for free!

 

It is emphasized prominently by Microsoft that they have made Power Automate free to use for anyone in the world who wants to use it - especially today in 2022.

 

Power Automate is now available for free to anyone in the world, and nobody can stop you*

 

Even within an organization nobody can block* you from using Power Automate - even inside of the organization tenant itself and using the organization provided account!

 

The Free license is very much not the same as the O365 one. The O365 one is managed by the organization. The "Free" one does not even require O365 or even require you to use your work e-mail address - you can use your personal one such as Outlook/Hotmail. The relationship is between the individual and Microsoft for this kind of license - not between the individual and your organization.

 

Even if you insist on using your work e-mail address and the organization tenant - even so, 

even your employer cannot stop you* from using Power Automate,

even in the organization you work at and using your organization email address and organization tenant,

and even if they want to stop you - they cannot stop you!*

 

*("nobody can block" - "cannot stop you" - but organizations can still try some ways to make it much harder for you to do something like this on their organization / tenant without their permission - for example in PowerShell they can try things like Set-MsolCompanySettings -AllowAdHocSubscriptions $false or Remove-AllowedConsentPlans -Types @("Internal", "Viral")  to make it harder for their  organization users to sign up for a Free Trial or Free Power Automate license at the organization level. However, I have not tested this, and even if it works, it may not necessarily remove the possibility of an individual using the Free license totally and completely - and it likely does not prevent them from simply just signing up for Power Automate Free on their personal account outside of the organization tenant).

 

Since there is no absolute way to stop someone from just using a personal account even with the PowerShell commands above, in order to make sure stuff from the personal account does not leak into the organization or vice versa for organizations concerned about data loss prevention or Power Automate governance concerns, it may be necessary to restrict cross tenant access (https://docs.microsoft.com) since by default cross tenant isolation is turned off to allow seamless integrations and connections between tenants.

 

Since from the above it is pretty obvious that not only is there a "Power Automate Free" license, but that it is even more prominent and accessible to the world than it was before - to the point that you literally cannot be stopped*  from using it.  the question then becomes, what are the exact action request limits of the Power Automate Free Plan!

 

My best guess for now is it's either 6,000 per 24 hours like in the Office 365 plan -  it is possible that it even could be lower than that, and additional limits might apply specifically to the "Free" plan.

 

I am not exactly sure what are the limits on the "Free" plan. 

 

I would suggest you check with Microsoft, I am not finding anything specific on this topic of the request limits on Power Automate Free plan, even in the Feb 2022 licensing guide

 

If you find out more details about this, please put a reply here as I would be curious about it too.

 

 Check if the above helps.

 

Other info you might find helpful: 

 

Some docs reference a "transition period" - which I think we are out of now (or, that we may be out of soon, "sometime in 2022"). It claimed (and may still claim now) in many places in the docs, the limits during the transition period were (or still are, for a little bit longer) "higher" than during the non-transition period. I actually did not fully understand what this meant at first, but I think it might have something to do with this table on this page (docs.microsoft.com) 

poweractivate_0-1645205331389.png

For example, according to the above table, notice how the Office 365 use rights were supposedly 10,000 action requests per user per 24 hours, during the transition period, "transition period limit", and this is supposedly 6,000  action requests per user per 24 hours, outside of the transition period, "actual limit".

This 6,000 number, also happens to match the current limit for the Office 365 Power Automate use rights.

 

Even on this table above, notice how the "Power Automate Free license" is not specified, interestingly enough. 

 

 

 

@ArshUser 

 


@ArshUser wrote:

Hey @poweractivate

someone else in the organization is trigger the flow, does that mean the 2K API request limit will be cutting down from that user's limit or mine?

 

 


I believe it will deduct the action request quota out from the user running the Flow in this case, even if you were the Flow author.

However, it depends under what credentials the Action Steps are running.

 

Those action steps set up and running under your credentials (your Connections) are deducted from your quota.

 

Those action steps that required the user to authenticate and create the connection on their own (their Connections) are deducted from their Quota.

 

The Trigger is also counted as at least one Action Step (Note that blocks may count as one, or more than one, request, it depends). In your example, the Trigger block will probably be counted against the other person (even if you were the author) - but only if the Trigger is set up under their credentials. If the Trigger is actually still using your credentials and it is being triggered by the other person - it probably counts towards you instead. All the Action steps and who they count towards, similarly depend on which credentials each individual Action Step the Connection is associated with.

 

It depends on the authentication credentials of each and every Action step in the Flow - whichever credentials are used in the Action steps is whoever it takes the quota from when the Flow runs that specific step.

 

Note that Action Steps may consume 1 unit of quota, or more than one unit, since some Action steps consume more than one unit and it may depend on the specific action step in question.

 

It is entirely possible that if the Flow contains a mix of Action steps with your connections and their connections some Quota is deduced from you and from that user for the corresponding Action steps. 

 

Check if it helps.

@ArshUser 


@ArshUser wrote:

Hey @poweractivate ,

 

Sorry about not adding this question to my previous response but I had one more doubt.

 

You mentioned "a specific Flow could only have about 2,000 Action requests per 24 hours (across all Flow runs in that 24 hour period for that specific Flow) - e.g. under Free plan". => Does this mean the 2K limit is only for one flow? What if I have multiple flows , will I have a 2K limit for each flow?

 

Asking this question because then creating Child Flows might be helpful?

 

Thanks!


I wrote a longer response on this in case it will help you.

 

Here is a shorter response.

 

For simplicity, I will presume Office 365.

 

I am not sure the action request limits applying to a single Flow apply anymore. I believe they do not apply anymore.

Even if they do still apply, splitting to multiple Flows will only work around up until the maximum limit (but I believe there is no longer per-Flow - but it is for the whole tenant).

 

I believe the 2,000 answer I gave before, was recently raised in November 2021

 

I believe you now get 6,000 API / Action Requests Per User Per 24 Hours - so I think you get 3x more than before now. 

I believe it is no longer necessary to split up the Flows - whether it is one Flow or multiple Flows, there is no way to go higher than 6,000 API / Action requests per user per 24 hours.

 

And if we happen to still be in the transition period now, it might be 10,000 Action Requests per user per 24 hours for the moment. If we are not, then it is 6,000 Action Requests per user per 24 hours.

 

Check if it helps @ArshUser 

 

Note that the above with 6,000 / user / 24 hrs is for the Office 365 use rights.

 

I am not sure about the answer to this for "Power Automate Free" plan limits (which is a separate license - see my longer response for the exact nuance) and can only guess that the limits might be the same - but I am not sure about this and suspect it may actually be lower and there may be caveats and additional limits in the "Free" plan.

 

ArshUser
Helper II
Helper II

@poweractivate 

Thanks for the explanation! I guess I was asking the details about the "Office 365 E1" plan and not the "Free" plan. I now understand that they are different!

 

Thankyou!

K-Bot
New Member

When using the Power Automate capabilities built into our Office 365 E3 licenses, where can I go to gather reporting analytics on the flows we're running?  

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Whether it's changing your username, updating an email address, understanding GDPR, or customizing your profile, this is the place to begin.¬† ‚ó謆Power Apps¬†‚ó謆Power Automate¬†‚ó謆Power Pages¬†‚ó謆Copilot Studio ¬† ¬† Back to Basics Tuesday Tip #2: All About Community Ranks Have you ever wondered how your fellow community members earn the different ranks available? What is the difference between an Advocate and a Helper, a Solution Sage and a Community Champion? In this #TuesdayTip, we share the secrets and tips to help YOU keep your ranking growing--and why it's so important to our communities. ‚ó謆Power Apps¬†‚ó謆Power Automate¬†‚ó謆Power Pages¬†‚ó謆Copilot Studio ¬† ¬† Back to Basics Tuesday Tip #3: Contributing to the Community If you need to understand how subscriptions or notifications work, how to use search to find the answers you're looking for, or editing your posts, this is the place to start.¬†With these handy tips, you'll find what you're looking for, ask some great questions, and format your posts perfectly! ‚ó謆Power Apps¬†‚ó謆Power Automate¬†‚ó謆Power Pages¬†‚ó謆Copilot Studio ¬† ¬† Back to Basics Tuesday Tip #4: What is a Super User? Have you ever been exploring the community and come across a user with this unique icon next to their name? It means you have found the actual, real-life superheroes of the Power Platform Community! Super Users are our heroes because of the way they are consistently helpful with everything from solutions to flagging spam, offering insight on the community, and so much more! Find out more in this #TuesdayTip. ¬† ‚ó謆Power Apps¬†‚ó謆Power Automate¬†‚ó謆Power Pages¬†‚ó謆Copilot Studio ¬† ¬† Back to Basics Tuesday Tip #5: How to Become a Community Blog Author We want YOU to be part of the community blog! Sharing your knowledge of Power Platform is an essential part of our community!¬† By sharing what you know and have learned with the community in the Power Platform in the community blog, you help us create a more engaged and informed community, better equipped to tackle complex challenges.¬†¬†To get started with blogging across the Power Platform communities, please visit the following links. ‚ó謆Power Apps¬†‚ó謆Power Automate¬†‚ó謆Power Pages¬†‚ó謆Copilot Studio ¬† ¬† Back to Basics Tuesday Tip #6 All About Community User Groups Being part of, starting, or leading a User Group can have many great benefits for our community members who want to learn, share, and connect with others who are interested in the Microsoft Power Platform and the low-code revolution.¬†Don't wait. Get involved with (or maybe even start) a User Group today--just follow the tips below to get started. ‚ó謆Power Apps¬†‚ó謆Power Automate¬†‚ó謆Power Pages¬†‚ó謆Copilot Studio ¬† ¬† Back to Basics Tuesday Tip #7: Resources for User Groups Once you've launched your Community User Group, we are excited to have many resources available that can help you lead, engage, and grow your User Group! Whether it's access to the Microsoft Community Tenant for User Groups, help with finding speakers for your User Group meetings (both local and virtual speakers), and even finding spaces to have your meetings in--check out this #TuesdayTip to get what you need! ‚ó謆Power Apps¬†‚ó謆Power Automate¬†‚ó謆Power Pages¬†‚ó謆Copilot Studio ¬† ¬† Back to Basics Tuesday Tip #8: All About Subscriptions and Notifications Keeping track of what you want to know and how you want to find out about it may seem confusing. This #TuesdayTip is all about your community profile's subscriptions and notifications settings. Check out the links below for clear directions and how-to's. ‚ó謆Power Apps¬†‚ó謆Power Automate¬†‚ó謆Power Pages¬†‚ó謆Copilot Studio ¬† ¬† Back to Basics Tuesday Tip #9: All About the Community Galleries Have you checked out the library of content in our galleries? Whether you're looking for the latest info on an upcoming event, a helpful webinar, or tips and tricks from some of our most experienced community members, our galleries are full of the latest and greatest video content for the Power Platform communities. Find out more by following the links below. ‚ó謆Power Apps¬†‚ó謆Power Automate¬†‚ó謆Power Pages¬†‚ó謆Copilot Studio ¬† ¬† ¬† Back to Basics Tuesday Tip #10: Community Support Whether you're a seasoned community veteran or just getting started, you may need a bit of help from time to time! If you need to share feedback with the Community Engagement team about the community or are looking for ways we can assist you with user groups, events, or something else,¬†Community Support¬†is the place to start. Community Support is part of every one of our communities, accessible to all our community members, so find out what it means for your community with our last #TuesdayTip. ‚ó謆Power Apps¬†‚ó謆Power Automate¬†‚ó謆Power Pages¬†‚ó謆Copilot Studio ¬† ¬† Thank you for your support for our #TuesdayTip series. We look forward to bringing you more tips and tricks to help make your community¬†experience the best it can be!

November 2023 Community Newsletter

Welcome to our¬†November Newsletter, where we highlight the latest news, product releases, upcoming events, and the amazing work of our outstanding Community members. If you're new to the Community, please make sure to follow the latest¬†News & Announcements¬†and check out the¬†Community on LinkedIn¬†as well! It's the best way to stay up-to-date¬†with all the news from across the Power Platform and beyond.¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† This month's highlights:- - Our most active community members- Microsoft Power Up Program- Microsoft Community Days website - The latest blogs and more ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† COMMUNITY HIGHLIGHTS Check out the most active community members of the last month. These hardworking members are posting regularly, answering questions, kudos, and providing top solutions in their communities. We are so thankful for each of you--keep up the great work! If you hope to see your name here next month, just get active! FLMikePstork1Nived_NambiarWarrenBelzSprongYeManishSolankiLaurensMwskinnermlcAgniusExpiscornovuscreativeopinion¬†KatieAUinzil2kHaressh2728hafizsultan242douicmccaughanwoLucas001domliu ¬† Power Up Program Click the image below to discover more about the amazing Microsoft Power Up Program, as Reem Omar, Abbas Godhrawala, Chahine Atallah, Ruby Ruiz Brown, Juan Francisco S√°nchez Enciso, Joscelyne Andrade Ar√©valo, Eric G. and Paulina PaŇāczyŇĄska share how non-tech professionals can successfully advance into a new career path using Microsoft #PowerPlatform. ¬† To find out more about this amazing initiative, click here to apply for the program and reboot your journey into low-code app development today! ¬† ¬† Community Days - Event Website Have you checked out the Community Days¬†website yet? Dedicated to the volunteer community organizers around the world, Community Days is the perfect place to find an event near you or add an event for wider exposure. Many thanks to Thomas Daly, Sharon Weaver, Sedat Tum, Jonathan Weaver, Manpreet Singh, David Leveille, Jason Rivera, Mike Maadarani, Rob Windsor and the team for all their hard work. Anyone can host a Community Day on any topic relevant to our industry, just click the image below to find out more. ¬† ¬† ¬† EVENT NEWS Power Platform French Summit - Paris/Virtual - 6-7th Dec It's not long now until the Power Platform French Summit, which takes place both virtually and in-person at the Microsoft France conference center in Paris on 6-7th December 2023. If you can't make it in-person, all sessions will also be broadcast on virtual networks for better distribution and accessibility. ¬† There's a fantastic array of speakers, including J√©r√©my LAPLAINE, Amira Beldjilali, R√©mi Chambard, Erika Beaumier, Makenson Frena, Assia Boutera, Elliott Pierret, Clothilde Facon, Gilles Pommier, Marie Aubert, Antoine Herbosa, Chlo√© Moreau, Rapha√ęl Senis, Rym Ben Hamida, Lo√Įc Cimon, Jos√©phine Salafia, David Zoonekyndt, A√Įcha Charpentier, Henry Jammes, Milene Rochard, Mehdi EL YASSIR, and many more. Click the image below for more information. ¬† ¬† ¬† LATEST COMMUNITY BLOG ARTICLES Power Apps Community Blog Power Automate Community Blog Copilot Community Blog Power Pages Community Blog

Back to Basics Tuesday Tip #10: Community Support

This is the¬†TENTH¬†post in¬†our ongoing series¬†dedicated to helping the amazing members of our community--both new members and seasoned veterans--learn and grow in how to best engage in the community! Each Tuesday, we feature new content that will help you best understand the community--from ranking and badges to profile avatars, from Super Users to blogging in the community. Our hope is that this information will help each of our community members grow in their experience with Power Platform, with the community, and with each other! ¬† This Week: All About Community Support ¬† Whether you're a seasoned community veteran or just getting started, you may need a bit of help from time to time! If you need to share feedback with the Community Engagement team about the community or are looking for ways we can assist you with user groups, events, or something else,¬†Community Support¬†is the place to start. ¬† Community Support is part of every one of our communities, accessible to all our community members. ¬† ¬† Power Apps:¬†https://powerusers.microsoft.com/t5/Community-Support/ct-p/pa_community_support Power Automate:¬†https://powerusers.microsoft.com/t5/Community-Support/ct-p/mpa_community_support Power Pages:¬†https://powerusers.microsoft.com/t5/Community-Support/ct-p/mpp_community_support Copilot Studio:¬†https://powerusers.microsoft.com/t5/Community-Support/ct-p/pva_community-support ¬† Within each community's¬†Community Support¬†page, you'll find three distinct areas, each with a different focus to help you when you need support from us most. ¬† ¬† Community Accounts & Registration¬†is the go-to source for any and all information related to your account here in the community. It's full of great knowledge base articles that will help you manage your community account and know what steps to take if you wish to close your account.¬†¬†‚󏬆 Power Apps¬†¬†‚󏬆¬†Power Automate¬†¬†‚󏬆¬†Power Pages,¬†‚󏬆¬†Copilot Studio¬† ¬† ¬† Using the Community¬†is your source for assistance with everything from Community User Groups to FAQ's and more. If you want to know what kudos are, how badges work, how to level up your User Group or something else, you will probably find the answers here.¬†‚󏬆¬†Power¬†Apps¬†¬†¬†‚󏬆Power Automate¬†¬†¬†¬†‚󏬆¬†Power Pages¬†¬†‚󏬆¬†Copilot Studio¬† ¬† ¬† Community Feedback¬†is where you can share opportunities, concerns, or get information from the Community Engagement team. It's your best place to post a question about an issue you're having in the community, a general question you need answered. Whatever it is, visit Community Feedback to get the answers you need right away. Our team is honored to partner with you and can't wait to help you!¬†¬†¬†‚󏬆 Power Apps¬†¬†‚󏬆Power Automate ¬†¬†‚󏬆Power Pages ¬†¬†‚󏬆Copilot Studio ¬†

Microsoft Ignite 2023: The Recap

What an amazing event we had this year, as Microsoft showcased the latest advancements in how AI has the potential to reshape how customers, partners and developers strategize the future of work. Check out below some of our handpicked videos and Ignite announcements to see how Microsoft is driving real change for users and businesses across the globe. ¬† Video Highlights Click the image below to check out a selection of Ignite 2023 videos, including the¬†"Microsoft Cloud in the era of AI"¬†keynote from¬†Scott Guthrie,¬†Charles Lamanna,¬†Arun Ulag,¬†Sarah Bird,¬†Rani Borkar,¬†Eric Boyd,¬†Erin Chapple,¬†Ali Ghodsi, and¬†Seth Juarez. There's also a great breakdown of the amazing¬†Microsoft Copilot Studio¬†with¬†Omar Aftab,¬†Gary Pretty, and¬†Kendra Springer, plus exciting sessions from¬†Rajesh Jha,¬†Jared Spataro,¬†Ryan Jones,¬†Zohar Raz, and many more. ¬† ¬† Blog Announcements Microsoft Copilot¬†presents an opportunity to reimagine the way we work‚ÄĒturning natural language into the most powerful productivity tool on the planet. With AI, organizations can unearth value in data across productivity tools like business applications and Microsoft 365. Click the link below to find out more. ¬† ¬† Check out the latest features in¬†Microsoft Power Apps¬†that will help developers create AI-infused apps faster, give administrators more control over managing thousands of Microsoft Power Platform makers at scale, and deliver better experiences to users around the world. Click the image¬†below to find out more. ¬† ¬† Click below to discover new ways to orchestrate business processes across your organization with¬†Copilot in Power Automate. With its user-friendly interface that offers hundreds of prebuilt drag-and-drop actions, more customers have been able to benefit from the power of automation. ¬† ¬† Discover how Microsoft Power Platform and Microsoft Dataverse are activating the strength of your enterprise data using AI, the announcement of¬†‚Äúplugins for Microsoft Copilot for Microsoft 365‚ÄĚ, plus two new Power Apps creator experiences using Excel and natural language. ¬† ¬† ¬† Click below to find out more about the general availability of¬†Microsoft Fabric¬†and the public preview of¬†Copilot in Microsoft Fabric.¬†With the launch of these next-generation analytics tools, you can empower your data teams to easily scale the demand on your growing business. ¬† ¬† And for the rest of all the good stuff, click the link below to visit the¬†Microsoft Ignite 2023¬†"Book of News", with over¬†ONE HUNDRED¬†announcements across infrastructure, data, security, new tools, AI, and everything else in-between! ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬†

Back to Basics Tuesday Tip #9: All About the Galleries

This is the ninth post in our series dedicated to helping the amazing members of our community--both new members and seasoned veterans--learn and grow in how to best engage in the community! Each Tuesday, we feature new content that will help you best understand the community--from ranking and badges to profile avatars, from Super Users to blogging in the community. Our hope is that this information will help each of our community members grow in their experience with Power Platform, with the community, and with each other!     Today's Tip: All About the Galleries Have you checked out the library of content in our galleries? Whether you're looking for the latest info on an upcoming event, a helpful webinar, or tips and tricks from some of our most experienced community members, our galleries are full of the latest and greatest video content for the Power Platform communities.   There are several different galleries in each community, but we recommend checking these out first:   Community Connections & How-To Videos Hosted by members of the Power Platform Community Engagement  Team and featuring community members from around the world, these helpful videos are a great way to "kick the tires" of Power Platform and find out more about your fellow community members! Check them out in Power Apps, Power Automate, Power Pages, and Copilot Studio!         Webinars & Video Gallery Each community has its own unique webinars and videos highlighting some of the great work being done across the Power Platform. Watch tutorials and demos by Microsoft staff, partners, and community gurus! Check them out: Power Apps Webinars & Video Gallery Power Automate Webinars & Video Gallery Power Pages Webinars & Video Gallery Copilot Studio Webinars & Video Gallery   Events Whether it's the excitement of the Microsoft Power Platform Conference, a local event near you, or one of the many other in-person and virtual connection opportunities around the world, this is the place to find out more about all the Power Platform-centered events. Power Apps Events Power Automate Events Power Pages Events Copilot Studio Events   Unique Galleries to Each Community Because each area of Power Platform has its own unique features and benefits, there are areas of the galleries dedicated specifically to videos about that product. Whether it's Power Apps samples from the community or the Power Automate Cookbook highlighting unique flows, the Bot Sharing Gallery in Copilot Studio or Front-End Code Samples in Power Pages, there's a gallery for you!   Check out each community's gallery today! Power Apps Gallery Power Automate Gallery Power Pages Gallery Copilot Studio Gallery

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