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JonathanGibbs
Resolver I
Resolver I

Your teammates need licenses to continue using your app. Select Get licenses to buy and assign them

I have built several Power Apps that access a SQL Server database located on a VM in Azure using Power Automate flows that call stored procedures via an on premises data gateway. All authentications are my own accounts. My licences include Office 365 E3, Power Apps Plan 1 (Qualified Offer), Microsoft Power Apps Plan 2 Trial, and Microsoft Power Automate Free.

 

I share these apps with colleagues who have Microsoft 365 Business Basic or Business Standard licences, and they are able to use the apps with no problems. They also usually have "Power Apps Plan 2 Trial" licences, though this doesn't seem to impact on their using the apps.

 

I noticed a banner on my Power Apps Apps listing website page recently (since disappeared) that said "Your teammates need licenses to continue using your app. Select Get licenses to buy and assign them."

 

Power Apps licensing has moved on to something completely different from the above. I'm aware of this, but the existing set up works fine so I've not made any changes. I am very confused. Is my set up going to stop working? If so, when? Do I have to spend more than I do now to continue having colleagues with MS 365 licences able to access the apps?

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Pstork1
Dual Super User III
Dual Super User III

It the flows that make calls against the SQL server are started from the Power App, then yes your colleagues all need either per user or per app licenses.  A trial license will also cover them until the trial runs out.  The system doesn't always catch that you have shared an app with other people who don't have premium licenses.  But they are still legally obligated to have them.  Your app may continue to work, but if you get audited by Microsoft you will be required to pay for additional licenses.  Your license does not cover other users even if its your account being used to connect to the SQL server.



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Pstork1
Dual Super User III
Dual Super User III

It the flows that make calls against the SQL server are started from the Power App, then yes your colleagues all need either per user or per app licenses.  A trial license will also cover them until the trial runs out.  The system doesn't always catch that you have shared an app with other people who don't have premium licenses.  But they are still legally obligated to have them.  Your app may continue to work, but if you get audited by Microsoft you will be required to pay for additional licenses.  Your license does not cover other users even if its your account being used to connect to the SQL server.



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Thank you @Pstork1. That 'The system doesn't always catch that you have shared an app with other people who don't have premium licenses' is a very useful insight. The licensing is so fiendishly complex, and I've tended towards the approach of 'if it works, don't fiddle with it' when a setup that doesn't appear to match the new rules still works perfectly well - I just assume I've missed something in the rules!

So I've got to break open the piggy bank, then...

The key to understanding the licensing depends on two things.

 

First, who's security context is the app/flow running under.  For an app this is always the user running the app.  For a flow it depends on the trigger.  Automated flows (like the ones that trigger based on creation or update of an item) run in the context of the flow maker.  Manually triggered flows (like the ones started from a button in a Power app) run in the context of the person who started them. The security context determines who might need a license.  So for automatic flows only the maker needs to be licensed.  For manually triggered flows and Power Apps everyone who runs it needs a license.

 

Second, the level of license required depends on what connectors the Power App or flow uses.  If it uses a premium connector (like SQL or an on-premises gateway) then it needs a premium license.  Premium licenses are either per user (any number of apps covered) or per app (one app covered).  Either of these will cover any associated flows too.  Associated flows can use any trigger, but they work on the same data source as the app. Only completely standalone flows need separate flow licensing.

 

So in your case you have an app that starts one or more flows manually.  Those flows use an on-premises gateway and SQL so they require premium licensing.  So everyone who runs the power app that starts them also requires premium licensing. Whether its per user or per app is a cost benefit analysis based on how many apps, with premium connectors, people run.  If this is only one app with associated flows you can get by with per app licenses for all the users.  

 

Hope that makes it clearer.



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JonathanGibbs
Resolver I
Resolver I

thanks again @Pstork1  - that's a much clearer explanation than anything I've found in the MS literature!

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